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Kratie, Cambodia
Kratie Province
 
Kratie Province, located on the east bank of the Mekong River, attracts a fair share of visitors, many of whom wish to catch a glimpse of the last few Irrawaddy Dolphins left in the world.  The recommended place to see them is Kampi Village, about 15 kilometers from town. Irrawaddy Dolphins are an endangered species and are extremely rare; it is estimated there are only about 60 living in this stretch of the river.
The town of Kratie offers an authentic rural ambience, and therefore serves as the perfect place to spend a peaceful night or two. It is a nice relief from some of the country’s more trafficked areas.
 
There numerous sites to visit in Kratie. Phnom Sombok is a small temple located on a hill north of town. A long flight of steps lead into a pavilion of Phnom Sombok that features detailed photos of afterlife punishments to those who have sinned in the present life. Wat Roka Kandal is a restored pagoda with an ancient Lao style ‘Stupa’ on the riverfront about 2 kilometers from the town center. Nearby lies a more modern pagoda where chanting of the monks can be heard at dawn and in the evenings. About 15 kilometers from town, there is a large Cham community. This is known locally as the ‘basket-weaving’ village; it is the biggest in Kratie with over 4000 villagers living here.
A popular end-of-the-day activity in Kratie is to relax by the riverfront to watch the sun set.
    
Place of interest
 
Kampi Dolphin Site
 
Kampi is the name of a small village situated at the east bank of the Mekong River, 15km north of Kratie on the old National Road 7.
Kampi is the best place in Cambodia to see the rare Mekong River Dolphin. Kampi Dolphin pool is the most inhabited dolpin pool in the Mekong River with about 20 dolphins. Kampi Dolphin Site was established in 1999 to welcome international and local tourists and for scientific researchers to study the Mekong River Dolphin.
 
There are motor boats available to shuttle visitors out of the Mekong River to see Dolphin at close quarters. The best time to see Dolphin is at dry season early morning and late afternoon.
 
Vihear Sarsar Mouy Rouy
 
Vihear Sarsar Mouy Rouy is a pagoda well-known for its history and as a place of pilgrimage for residents of Kratie. Vihear Sarsar Mouy Rouy, meaning 'Temple with 100 columns', was first built in the 16th century by King Chann Reachea. The pagoda included 100 wooden columns to commemorate the memory of his daughter Vorakpheak. The pagoda is located in Sambor town, 36 km from Kratie. To get there, take the old N R 7 along the River bank 24 km to Sandan village and continue northward 12 km by the River road to Sambo.
 
HISTORY OF VIHEAR SARSAR MOUY ROUY
 
In the 16th century, King Chann Reachea reigned over the country and lived in the former capital City of Oudong. He had a daughter named Vorakpheak. Once the daughter was ill, he commanded his servants to invite the head of Buddhist monastery at Neak Sen pagoda (located at Chrouy Banteay commune Prek Prasop district) to cure his daughter’s illness. While the head of the monk was absent from the pagoda, Nen Thun his favorite student who learnt white magic spell secretly, and then he was magically transformed into a crocodile called “Crocodile Nen Thun”. When the teacher returned, Nen Thun had become a crocodile and could not turn to be a human being. Then he always took his teacher on his back to cure the king’s daughter.
 
One day, a mighty crocodile called Sopor Kaley, that wanted to challenge with Nen Thun, stopped Nen Thun while he was carrying his teacher on the way back from the palace. The two crocodiles then started fighting. As Nen Thun could not find way to save his teacher, he decided to swallow his teacher into his stomach to keep safe for a while. The fighting lasted 3 days and 3 night, and finally Sopor Kaley was defeated and then died and suddenly turn into a mountain presently called Sopor Kaley. When Nen Thun threw out his teacher from his stomach, he was alredy dead. Nen Thun was very sorry and determined to kill he king’s daughter because he thought that she was the cause of his teacher’s death. Nen Thun  swam quietly and suddenly swallowed the king’s daughter who was playing at the Royal Palace port. 
King Chann Reachea commanded his confidants to follow Nen Thun until they reached the place now known as Sambor caught crocodile (Nen Thun) there and cut open the crocodile’s stomach to get the king’s daughter out. The king decided to bury her corpse in Sambor and build a 100-column pagoda to dedicate to the spirit of his daughter.
 

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